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London Fairness Commission launch final report

Published: 17 Mar 2016

London_Fairness_Commission_launch_final_report

On Tuesday 15th March, The London Fairness Commission launched their final report and presented their recommendations to three of the candidates in the race to become the next Mayor of London. Sadiq Kahn (Labour), Sian Berry (Green Party) and Caroline Pidgeon (Lib Dems) joined members of the Commission at The Deck of the National Theatre.

The London Fairness Commission, established by Toynbee Hall and My Fair London, with funding from Trust for London, Tudor Trust, London Funders and City Bridge Trust, is chaired by Lord Victor Adebowale and is compromised of expert commissioners in business, research, health and charity.

The Commission began one year ago and was created to initiate a city wide debate in response to the question, Is London a fair city? The new report summarises the research conducted over the last year and outlines a set of recommendations for the next mayor of London on how to make London a fairer City.

The research conducted by the Commission revealed that Londoners believe they are living in an increasingly unfair city and the findings conclude that this unfairness could hold London back in the future. The recommendations set out within this report will now be handed over to City Hall for the new Mayor, to work with the people of London and create fairer city for all.

The event was chaired by the Editor of the Evening Standard, Sarah Sands, who put forward the recommendations to each candidate, followed by short Q&A’s with members of the audience made up of charities, social policy makers, think tanks and Londoners. Housing, private rents, living wage, the cost of living, transport, childcare and opportunities for young people were key issues discussed and each mayoral candidate called for measures to be put in place to make London a fairer city for all.

In this, the Commission’s final report, there are recommendations for the Mayor of London and other people in politics, for civil society, institutions, and employers and for London.

Ultimately, it is for Londoners to decide the path their city takes; for Londoners to own fairness rather than be told what is fair.”

Lord Victor Adebowale, Chair of the London Fairness Commission

Click here to read the final report in full

Find out more about the London Fairness Commission

Want to get involved in the conversation on fairness? Tweet using the hashtag #LondonFairness and have your say

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